Jewish club makes mighty comeback

Candles+and+traditional+bread%2C+Challah%2C+are+staples+on+Shabbat%2C+a+holiday+that+the+Jewish+club+will+educate+about.
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Jewish club makes mighty comeback

Candles and traditional bread, Challah, are staples on Shabbat, a holiday that the Jewish club will educate about.

Candles and traditional bread, Challah, are staples on Shabbat, a holiday that the Jewish club will educate about.

Candles and traditional bread, Challah, are staples on Shabbat, a holiday that the Jewish club will educate about.

Candles and traditional bread, Challah, are staples on Shabbat, a holiday that the Jewish club will educate about.

Danielle Hamer, Scot Scoop In Depth Editor

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It’s no secret that Carlmont students are diverse- in terms of religion, culture, background, and nationality. From Persian Club to Christian Club, there are many clubs on campus that reflect this. Now, the Jewish club is in development, with aspirations to celebrate Judaism and educate about Jewish culture.

Restarted by current juniors Andrew Wach and Becca Fradkin, the Jewish club has previously come and left the school club scene, and is now ready to be put into full force again.  The club’s meetings this year have so far been just the two founders, who are brainstorming ideas for a club that is both educational and fun for everyone.

Candles and traditional bread, Challah, are staples on Shabbat, a holiday that the Jewish club will educate about.

Candles and traditional bread, Challah, are staples on Shabbat, a holiday that the Jewish club will educate about.

Junior and co-president Andrew Wach said, “We created the club to create a more unified Jewish community at Carlmont, and make sure that people know about our religion.”

Once the club is open to members, the leaders will put the innovative ideas they have developed into action.

Wach said, “Next year, we may create ‘gelt-o-grams” for people who celebrate Hanukkah but still like giving letters and candy, like the Christmas candy-grams students can send out to their friends. We have decided that during meetings we will bring in Jewish food, and even celebrate Jewish holidays together.”

For students who are Jewish, but do not take part in Jewish organizations or have strong connections to their temples, they are looking at this upcoming club as a way to practice their religion easily.

Junior Amanda Breslauer said, “I am so busy, so it is really difficult to go to temple functions and Jewish events on weekends. I hope that when I join Jewish club, I will have fun being surrounded by Jewish students like me, and be able to celebrate holidays more often.”

While the club’s recent comeback to Carlmont has sparked interest in many Jewish students, there are also non-Jewish students who see the benefits of having the club.

Senior Tristan Gasperian, who is not Jewish, said, “I hope that I will be able to come to club meetings, so I can learn about Judaism- a lot of people do not know a lot about the Jewish religion, and it seems like it is very interesting.”

Whether it is cooking traditional Jewish food, celebrating Jewish holidays in fun ways, or simply educating Carlmont’s student body about what this traditional religion has to offer, the Jewish Club seems like a success on the rise.

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