Tsuchiyama enjoys teaching and gaming

Tsuchiyama loves playing video game but takes his teaching seriously.

Tsuchiyama loves playing video game but takes his teaching seriously.

Lizzy Doctorov, Staff Writer

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Call of Duty, Far Cry 3, The Last of Us, and God of War are only some of the video games that Robert Tsuchiyama enjoys playing in his down time.

Tsuchiyama’s career as a math teacher is the result of his desire to assist his classmate and friends in college.

Tsuchiyama said, “In college, I spent most of my time tutoring my friends that were business majors, and everyone kept saying I should go into teaching. My own grades were suffering but I was more concerned with helping them out.”

This willingness to help others is still evident today.

Sophomore Luke Mohler said, “His explanations are nice and easy to comprehend. He is also able to joke with the class without offending anyone while still coming across as knowing.”

Tsuchiyama loves playing video game but takes his teaching seriously.

Tsuchiyama loves playing video game but takes his teaching seriously.

While Tsuchiyama is well liked as a math teacher and takes his job very seriously, math isn’t the only thing that takes up his time. Tsuchiyama destroys the stereotype of the boring math teacher by indulging in video games when not spending time grading papers and teaching classes.

Tsuchiyama has owned the Magnavox Odyssey, the world’s first home video game console, the Atari 2600, the SEGA Genesis, the Nintendo, the Super Nintendo, the GameCube, the Wii, PlayStation 1, 2, and 3, and all of the Game Boys.

Tsuchiyama’s personal preferences are action and first person shooter games, along with racing and fighting games, but he usually settles for whatever games his kids have.

Although he enjoys utilizing the newest game consoles, Tsuchiyama doesn’t play anything online, as it’s too new for him.

Tsuchiyama’s love of video games appears to run in the family.

Tsuchiyama said, “My mom loved the Atari too. She played video games until she passed away.”

His son, sophomore Justin Tsuchiyama, said, “I’ve always liked [my dad] playing video games because he got me into video games and he would be okay with [my sister and I] playing longer games or getting new ones.”

Tsuchiyama’s love of video games doesn’t impair his teaching. In fact, it sometimes makes students like him more.

Rexer said, “Video games let people relax and have fun, and let them bond with their kids. It makes him more relatable.”

Mohler said, “Everyone has their own hobbies. He clearly knows his material, and doesn’t let

get in the way of his teaching.”

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