DIY Earthcycle Club seeks to uplift and upcycle

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DIY Earthcycle Club seeks to uplift and upcycle

Club President Kayla Hogan demonstrates how to make a scrunchie with scrap fabric and string.

Club President Kayla Hogan demonstrates how to make a scrunchie with scrap fabric and string.

Keya Arora

Club President Kayla Hogan demonstrates how to make a scrunchie with scrap fabric and string.

Keya Arora

Keya Arora

Club President Kayla Hogan demonstrates how to make a scrunchie with scrap fabric and string.

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Considering the current state of the environment, the expression “reduce, reuse, recycle” that is often used to promote good habits in children is more important now than ever.

Accordingly, DIY Earthcycle Club stays true to this motto and aims to turn recycling into something a bit more fun than a chore. The club was started this year by sophomores Kayla Hogan, Erin Kee, and Aylin Salahifar, with a goal to repurpose recyclable materials through crafts and projects.

“Mainly, we’d like people to relax and have fun while finding new ways to use things they would otherwise throw out,” Hogan said. “Our goal was always to involve some sort of craft or activity so that the club wasn’t solely about upcycling.”

Many of the club’s members agree that the crafts are an engaging way to give back to the environment.

“I think incorporating crafts and activities into the club’s goal is a brilliant idea,” said Sofie Hai, a club member. “It doesn’t take a lot of effort to recycle, so people don’t have an excuse not to do it.”

Activities the club plans includes making scrunchies out of scraps, recycled candle holders out of metal, and throw pillow covers out of unused fabric. Such freedom to create what they want contributes greatly to the the enjoyment of club members.

“My favorite part about the club is its environment,” said Kaliya Mah, a club member. “It’s a safe space for creativity, and makes something important like recycling attainable by starting small and working on the simple items.”

While there are quite a few other earth-friendly clubs on campus, DIY Earthcycle Club is sure to differentiate themselves.

“I think other clubs, such as Green Team, focus a lot more on the active part of environmental change, like protests. We wanted something a bit more laid back that would still involve upcycling and reducing waste,” Hogan said.

Recycling is often seen as something tedious and time consuming. Clubs like DIY Earthcycle hope to paint it as a more pleasurable activity and change people’s habits for the better.

The club holds its meetings every Monday during lunch in Room S10.

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