Scot Scoop News

Social media continues to veil effective coping

Friends+share+a+hug+in+the+hallway+in+the+midst+of+school+stress.
Friends share a hug in the hallway in the midst of school stress.

Friends share a hug in the hallway in the midst of school stress.

Talia Fine

Talia Fine

Friends share a hug in the hallway in the midst of school stress.

Editorial Staff

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Whether news comes through emails, texts, or snapchats, we all use social media to share experiences and get information.

But social media veils the truths about lives and events.

“Social media is like this giant filter on everyone’s lives and in my eyes, it’s fake and not genuine, so having to find out super disturbing news didn’t feel real because I found out through social media,” said Briana McDonald, a junior who found out about her friend’s suicide over the internet.

The candid online process of receiving intense information also affects the way people deal with that information.

According to researchers at the University of California, San Diego, humans receive about 34 gigabytes of information per day, or 100,000 words plus images and video. This informational overloading affects a person’s ability to feel, so processing the death of a fellow student through a screen is inherently ingenuine and produces off-base responses.

These factors make it impossible for social media to do justice for a life or tragedy.

However, there is a good side to social media and that is spreading love. Messages of love help people to not feel alone.

But the internet is an impersonal way to spread anything– whether it’s joy, laughter, love, or pain.

Talking to other people is the best way to overcome depression and to cope with any hardship, trauma, or adversity.

The American Psychological Society calls therapy one of the main ways people can recover from anxiety disorders and trauma.

Mayo Clinic also cites “talk therapy” as a main coping mechanism for depression.

Do not cope with tragedy and pain through the internet or force other people to do so either. Talk to a real person– friends, siblings, parents, grandparents, teachers, priests, rabbis, anyone– and be available to talk to others who may be struggling too.

This editorial reflects the views of the Scot Scoop editorial board. This editorial was written by Talia Fine.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
(Visited 4 times today)

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






About the Contributors
Editorial Staff, Site Editors

The Scot Scoop editorial staff strives to maintain reliable reporting while covering the hard-hitting topics that interest our community. Content on Scot Scoop is managed, reviewed, and maintained by the editorial staff. Staff members and editors use a variety of tools and methods to produce, edit, and publish content.

Editorial staff members are Ben Balster, Kaylee George, Celine Yang, Hanalei Pham, Sarah Cheung, Talia Fine, and Brooke Chang.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Talia Fine, Scot Scoop Editor

Talia is a water polo player and wrestler for Carlmont, as well as an avid community volunteer. In her free time, Talia likes to play with her pets, do art, and be outside as much as possible.

@talia_fine

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

We invite comments and responses to our content. Comments will be published that are deemed appropriate and relevant.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Editorials

    Editorial: Teens jeopardize the confidentiality PSAT content by meme-ing

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: Asking someone’s race is simple

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: Women don’t matter

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Editorials

    Editorial: College application fees should factor into students’ plans

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: How you should argue for abortion (part 1, probably)

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: Sexual assault is timeless; it’s never okay

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: Brett Kavanaugh is not the victim

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: On Smartphone addiction and education

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    Opinion: Election Day should be a national holiday

  • Social media continues to veil effective coping

    Opinion

    9/11 cannot be forgotten

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The student news site of Carlmont High School in Belmont, California.
Social media continues to veil effective coping