Carlmont football feels effects of COVID-19

Joshua Yglesias, a junior, cleans weights. Despite the practice restrictions, the Carlmont football team is able to have some activity, such as lifting weights.

Ryan Holoyda

Joshua Yglesias, a junior, cleans weights. Despite the practice restrictions, the Carlmont football team is able to have some activity, such as lifting weights.

Along with the rest of the Central Coast Section (CCS), the Carlmont football program, led by their new head coach, Eric Rado, has started preseason workouts.

However, not without restrictions, as current conditions and county guidelines limit their activities. With the first padded and ball-throwing practice on Dec. 14 and the season kickoff on Jan. 8, there is still much work to be done.

“During normal times, it’s just, we changed the date. [This] just gives us more time to lift and get better on the field doing agility stuff,” Rado said.

Without the use of pads or passing a football around, practices have gone back to what some call “the basics.” They have reverted to agility and lifting workouts for the time being. Rado created a three pod system for both JV and varsity. Each pod would practice every other day, making sure everyone stays six feet away and safe. However, to make sure everyone can breathe, players are allowed to take off their masks when practicing.

“[The players have] been taking a bunch of time out of their lives to work hard and do the same thing that I’ve done,” said Luke Nessel, a sophomore. “That is, preparing myself and themselves to win this year.” 

This upcoming season will be Nessel’s first time playing varsity football, although he previously played nine years of Pop Warner football and one year of high school. He is very excited to get into the best shape possible and make sure his team is with him the whole way. Other players are also ensuring they are at the top of their game.

Justin Lavulo, a senior, lifts weights in preparation for the new season. (Ryan Holoyda)

“My personal trainer allows me to start hitting, and he has equipment that I can use to have better time management,” said Michael Moreno, a junior.

With distance learning, academics have become more difficult and stressful for some people. Academics are crucial in sports because, without a GPA of 2.0 or higher, athletes are not allowed to play in games. As a result, there have been a lot of players starting to take school much more seriously.

“I’ll take time out of my day to help [my teammates] get better grades,” Nessel said. “Grades are what matter.”

With the new season being pushed back to Dec. 14, players are now taking advantage of what seems like a misfortune. Players have started to work even harder in the weight room under Rado. Still, the team is also taking extra care to make sure everyone stays safe during these times.

In all, the football program’s extra work this offseason has one goal: when the first game comes around, they will be ready to dominate.

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