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Many explore new Thanksgiving traditions

During Thanksgiving break, many people do things they wouldn't be able to do during school. Sophomore Miya Okumura (center), finishes the San Jose Rock n’ Roll half-marathon and takes a photo with rock duo Jamestown Revival. “I ran the first nine miles, walked the rest, and afterward, I got a frappucino,” said Okumura, laughing.

During Thanksgiving break, many people do things they wouldn't be able to do during school. Sophomore Miya Okumura (center), finishes the San Jose Rock n’ Roll half-marathon and takes a photo with rock duo Jamestown Revival. “I ran the first nine miles, walked the rest, and afterward, I got a frappucino,” said Okumura, laughing.

Kimiko Okumura

During Thanksgiving break, many people do things they wouldn't be able to do during school. Sophomore Miya Okumura (center), finishes the San Jose Rock n’ Roll half-marathon and takes a photo with rock duo Jamestown Revival. “I ran the first nine miles, walked the rest, and afterward, I got a frappucino,” said Okumura, laughing.

Kimiko Okumura

Kimiko Okumura

During Thanksgiving break, many people do things they wouldn't be able to do during school. Sophomore Miya Okumura (center), finishes the San Jose Rock n’ Roll half-marathon and takes a photo with rock duo Jamestown Revival. “I ran the first nine miles, walked the rest, and afterward, I got a frappucino,” said Okumura, laughing.

Many explore new Thanksgiving traditions

November 24, 2015

The way many people celebrate Thanksgiving has changed over the years. However, one central idea remains in the name of the holiday — giving thanks.

For many, Thanksgiving is a time to get together with family and friends, often with traditions such as eating turkey and watching football games. But mainly, it’s a welcome break for people to recharge and reflect on their lives.

“We [my family] either all get along or don’t get along. I yell at people while we’re making dinner since someone’s likely doing something wrong, but it’s a way to bond,” said sophomore Daisha Sherman.

Sherman and her family have a tradition of making food that not many would expect.

“We’re going to make, or rather, attempt to make, food with Blue Apron. My dad’s a pescatarian [and] we usually don’t get meat, so when we do get it, I get excited for some good quality meat!” said Sherman.

Blue Apron is a business that delivers pre-measured ingredients and a recipe in a box. After all, the offer is tempting; Blue Apron offers recipes such as Apple-Cider Glazed Chicken, Seared Cod and Garlic Ginger Rice, and Pork Chops and Apple Mostarda.

Some people from other cultures also take part in Thanksgiving with their own traditions.

Parent Yvonne Li, who is ethnically Chinese, said, “This Thanksgiving we’re having old friends over. Instead of having turkey and gravy, we’re getting a turkey from San Francisco and incorporating it into a Chinese dish that usually has Peking duck.”

Thanksgiving also comes right before finals and Dead Week, signaling the start of the holiday season.

“School is stressful and puts a lot of pressure on me. Everyone needs a break once in a while — a break that’s longer than a weekend,” said sophomore Miya Okumura.

Not only are students anticipating time off, but the teachers are also looking forward to the break. Andrea Seremet, Government and AP Psychology teacher, is going over to a friend’s house for dinner.

“It’s a new thing that just started, which is nice since you can be with people and share a meal. It would suck to be alone!” said Seremet.

She advised her students, “Don’t forget to be mindful of people who have been supporting you, whether it’s been family, friends, the person who drives you to school, whoever.”

While all these people have their own traditions for Thanksgiving, they all have something that they’ll always be thankful for.

For Sherman, it’s her dog, the Puff, also known as the Puffmeister.  He was Sherman’s 14th birthday present. Sherman said of her Pomeranian, “I’m thankful for [the Puff] because he’s always so happy and makes me feel important.” The Puff was adopted from an SPCA shelter and had surgery for breathing issues.

“He’s always so happy when we come home! He’s constantly jumping and he’s really fluffy and soft,” said Sherman.

Daisha Sherman

For Okumura, it’s her cousin Sadie.

“She’s a good listener, gives good advice, and she’s funny and smart!” said Okumura. “We usually go outside and talk about our problems or shop at the Hillsdale Mall.”

As for sophomore Oliver Golden, it’s his own privilege.

“I’m grateful for the economic security to be able to celebrate with the people that I love. My family’s alive, my friends support me, and I can talk to them when something’s troubling me,” said Golden.

What all these people have in common are cherishing what they have. Their lives, their relationships with others, and the world around them. In the fast-paced lives of many people, it’s easy to forget about the privilege we have in life.

So whether you’ll spend this Thursday watching the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving parade, eating good food, or spending time with loved ones, always remember to be thankful.

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