Ebola strikes the United States

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Ebola strikes the United States

A close look at the Ebola Virus

A close look at the Ebola Virus

ABC News

A close look at the Ebola Virus

ABC News

ABC News

A close look at the Ebola Virus

Taran Sun, Managing Editor

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The first uncontrolled entry of the deadly Ebola virus into the United States occurred on Sept. 20.

According to NBC News, Thomas Eric Duncan left Liberia on Sept. 19 carrying the virus. He arrived in Texas, and is currently being treated at a Dallas hospital.

Junior Brent Jang said, “I think the virus is really terrifying, but with modern technology and the awareness of the current situation, it’s hard to imagine an epidemic occurring in the United States.”

The virus itself first emerged in various regions of Africa, one area being the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Ebola symptoms usually first appear in the form of headaches, chills, and fever. The symptoms progress to vomiting and internal hemorrhaging, then leading to seizures, loss of consciousness, and death.

The virus is not contagious during the “incubation period,” meaning people are not capable of transmitting the virus until the disease has taken hold and the symptoms are experienced. It requires direct contact form bodily fluids to transmit Ebola.

Sophomore Daniel Wehara said, “Since the virus can’t be spread through the air like some other diseases, and can only be spread through body fluid, I think that it should be easy to contain.”

According to ABC News, five students may have been exposed to Ebola by Duncan. The children attended four different schools earlier this week, and have since been sent home. They were reported to have no symptoms at the time they were at school.

Junior Alex Yang said, “In my opinion, the possibility of the disease spreading is low at the moment, because of the fact that the patient that has Ebola is being closely watched. I think that the fact that the kids that went to school after possibly coming into contact with the virus is an issue, and the medical people involved need to be sure that the kids didn’t pass on Ebola.”

Because of the fact that the children involved showed no signs of the virus, many have assumed that if they were indeed carrying it throughout their schools that it was not capable of being transmitted at the time.

The United States currently is awaiting further information which will reveal if there is no need to worry about the virus, or if there is the possibility of an outbreak.

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