The student news site of Carlmont High School in Belmont, California.

Scot Scoop News

The student news site of Carlmont High School in Belmont, California.

Scot Scoop News

The student news site of Carlmont High School in Belmont, California.

Scot Scoop News

New educational bill encourages parent involvement

As+the+course+selection+process+begins%2C+high+school+students+often+ask+their+parents+for+advice+on+which+classes+to+take.+Parents+have+been+more+inclined+to+offer+input+or+even+outright+choose+classes+for+their+children%2C+said+Jonathan+Park%2C+a+sophomore+at+Carlmont.+
Counselor one-on-one meeting / Joshua Wu / Canva Magic Media / Originally Created with AI
As the course selection process begins, high school students often ask their parents for advice on which classes to take. “Parents have been more inclined to offer input or even outright choose classes for their children,” said Jonathan Park, a sophomore at Carlmont.

Schools are now required to notify parents of the Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), career technical education (CTE), and dual enrollment courses per bill AB 1796.

Over the years, parents have become more involved in their child’s academic course selection. 

“A parent can have a huge influence on a child’s decisions, so if they know all the information, they can help the child make the best decision possible,” said Alex Kim, a sophomore at Carlmont.

According to the Pew Research Center, 71% of parents believe parenting significantly impacts their child’s performance. 

“More parental involvement is good in general, as they can help their children to figure out what’s best for them to do both mentally and so that they learn and develop the best,” said Carlmont senior Pranav Kamat. 

Assemblyman Juan Alanis, who introduced the bill, conducted research showing that 71.5% of respondents were satisfied with the amount of AP, IB, and CTE classes offered at their schools. 

Carlmont has also changed its course system to allow more AP classes to be taken at a lower grade level. For instance, sophomores will be allowed to take AP Seminar beginning next year, and juniors can take AP Language and Composition. 

“Because of the robust nature of the classes and the fact that so many of them are academically inclined to a degree that I did not have the opportunity to experience when I was in high school, kids that want to be pushed are pushed appropriately,” said Jayson Waller, a history teacher at Carlmont.

Because of the robust nature of the classes and the fact that so many of them are academically inclined to a degree that I did not have the opportunity to experience when I was in high school, kids that want to be pushed are pushed appropriately.

— Jayson Waller

Because of bill AB 1796, parents at Carlmont will be notified of the changing opportunities offered every year. 

“It’s great that parents can learn about what resources and opportunities the school offers and that they can discuss those options with their children,” Kamat said. 

As each year in high school becomes increasingly stressful, it can be helpful for parents to know their child’s academic situation.

“When parents know what’s going on in their kids’ lives, they can help, as opposed to being completely in the dark,” Waller said. 

However, some argue that students develop valuable skills with less interference from their parents.

“Less parental involvement is better because it promotes the students’ independence as well as letting them explore topics they are interested in,” said Jonathan Park, a sophomore at Carlmont. 

While parent knowledge of course offerings is important, Park believes student interest is key.

“While I do think it is good for parents to know the different classes offered, I do not think they should push or advocate for a class if the student is not interested in said class,” Park said. 

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About the Contributor
Joshua Wu, Staff Writer
Joshua Wu (Class of 2026) is a sophomore at Carlmont High School. He is covering local news and hopes to improve his skills in covering media and writing. Outside of school, you can find him volunteering for several organizations, playing sports, listening to music, or hanging out with friends.

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