Don’t tap the white tile

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Don’t tap the white tile

A Carlmont High School student plays the new app, Don't Tap the White Tile.

A Carlmont High School student plays the new app, Don't Tap the White Tile.

A Carlmont High School student plays the new app, Don't Tap the White Tile.

A Carlmont High School student plays the new app, Don't Tap the White Tile.

Kimiko Okumura, Highlander Editor

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A new app, Don’t Tap the White Tile, has climbed to the number one spot in top charts for Android and iOS.

As the name states, the objective is to tap the black tiles as quickly as possible without tapping the white tiles or missing a black tile. Similar to many addicting apps, it does not require an abundance of knowledge or strategy.

Created by Hu Wen Zeng, it is number one in both the Google Play and Apple App store, with a rating of four and a half stars out of five stars. Zeng changed the name for iOS to Piano Tiles to avoid confusion, but the game for Android and iOS are the same

“I like it because the concept is simple, and there’s a bunch of different modes, so it’s not boring,” said sophomore Sydney Cho.

There are five modes in the game, classic, arcade, zen, rush, and relay. In classic mode, the user tries to tap 50 black tiles as fast as possible.

In arcade mode, the objective is to tap as many black tiles as possible, without missing one. In zen mode, the user tries to tap as many black tiles as they can in 30 seconds.

“My favorite is the classic mode because it’s fast paced and addictive,” said freshman Stuart Vickery.

Rush mode is similar to arcade mode, except the speed of the tiles scrolling down the screen will increase as time passes.In relay mode, the user must complete 50 tiles in 10 seconds, and will receive another 10 seconds to tap another 50 tiles.

“The game is super addicting because every single time I lose makes me want to play it more so I can win,” said sophomore Melissa Chee.

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