Succulents for Seniors Club reaches out to the elderly

Members of Succulents for Seniors Club arrange succulents to pass out to the elderly in the San Carlos Elms retirement home.

Nicole Klein

Members of Succulents for Seniors Club arrange succulents to pass out to the elderly in the San Carlos Elms retirement home.

As time flies by and new generations evolve, the members of Succulents for Seniors Club remember to recognize the elderly in our communities in a unique and sentimental way. 

During their weekly meetings, club members arrange succulents into pots to give to the residents in the San Carlos Elms retirement home. By doing this, the youth have a chance to bond with older generations while learning valuable life skills.

“Some of the conversations you hear between the residents in the senior homes can be really interesting because you learn about their past experiences,” said Elle Brough, a junior and club president. 

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It’s not so much just the succulents or small things we do. It’s the value we gain from interacting with the seniors and bonding with them.”

— Elle Brough, club president

According to Elder Care Alliance, a website for a retirement home with locations all over California, socializing at an old age has both physical and mental benefits. To some members in retirement homes, socializing is particularly cherished because some are widowed or without close loved ones and family to offer assistance.

To help fix this problem, inspired youth volunteer at these homes and play the piano or perform other talents. In contrast, Succulents for Seniors Club finds the importance of giving small gifts, such as the succulents, to brighten the moods of the elderly living in the homes. 

Amelia Clevenger, a freshman, joined the club to try something she might not otherwise have the chance to do. 

“I love seeing the smiles on the seniors’ faces when we visit them. Many seniors often become lonely, so there are definitely benefits from even just talking to them,” Clevenger said.

Aside from assembling the succulents, club members try other similar activities throughout the year. For example, on Thanksgiving, the youth made pumpkins and turkeys out of clay to make the holidays more festive. On Valentine’s Day, club members made cards filled with succulent puns to cheer up the seniors. From time to time, the students make personalized origami plants.

It’s not so much just the succulents or small things we do. It’s the value we gain from interacting with the seniors and bonding with them,” Brough said. 

Although there are a few other service-oriented clubs at Carlmont, such as Mission Marine Club and Bay Area Youth Club, Succulents for Seniors Club stands out by socializing with the elderly directly. 

During their monthly visits, club members have a chance to socialize with the elderly and learn how to communicate with older generations. Often, the elderly share their own stories or give advice to the youth.

 

 

 

 

In the near future, the co-presidents of the club strive to expand their club to more students. In an effort to increase club participation, the club leaders created an Instagram account to further connect with the students at Carlmont and publicize their accomplishments.   

Currently, club members are brainstorming other activities to take part in to continue bonding with the seniors. 

Spending time with the elderly is a very rewarding experience,” said, Anique Vachon, a sophomore. “We would want the same care and recognition when we will be in their position.”