K.I.L.T.S. and S.R.S. rock the stage

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K.I.L.T.S. and S.R.S. rock the stage

Casey Wilkenson, Laura Ong, Cailin Greenburg, Charlotte Lewis and Sarah Burry of SRS

Casey Wilkenson, Laura Ong, Cailin Greenburg, Charlotte Lewis and Sarah Burry of SRS

Casey Wilkenson, Laura Ong, Cailin Greenburg, Charlotte Lewis and Sarah Burry of SRS

Casey Wilkenson, Laura Ong, Cailin Greenburg, Charlotte Lewis and Sarah Burry of SRS


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[media-credit name=”Virginia O” align=”alignnone” width=”1024″][/media-credit]

Casey Wilkenson, Laura Ong, Cailin Greenburg, Charlotte Lewis and Sarah Burry of SRS

The Carlmont Staged Reading Society (SRS) and comedy improv troupe (K.I.L.T.S.) rocked the studio theater on Thursday with their variety of acts.

The night started off with the SRS performing several short excerpts and poems, many of them written by members of SRS. The tones of each read piece differed from sad and heart-wrenching to up-beat and funny.

“It’s fun being on stage and up there with the people in SRS,” said Laura Ong, one of the authors of a piece performed, “Doubt”. “I am new to acting so this is a nice sort of bridge for me.”

One particularly amusing one that had the audience laughing was titled “A Note to My Chair,” written and performed by Ben Lippert, that followed a man’s journey from “normal”, chair-hating civilian to being behind bars for vandalizing public property (read: throwing a chair out a door).

Sad and dramatic ones included “Laramie Project,” a piece that followed the court case and trial of the hate crime and murder of Matthew Shepard, a gay teen in Wyoming in 1998. The SRS performed in a heart-wrenching manner, leaving lumps in the throat of at least some of the audience members.

After a 15 minute intermission, K.I.L.T.S. took to the stage, starting with short-form improv games then finishing their act with a long-form, slightly complicated improv called “The Harold” that spiraled into chaos and hilarity as the members twisted unusual stories about human-eating Atlantians and octopi that attempt to take over Japan.

“It’s so much fun, because we make people laugh and I’m having fun being on stage with the people that I love.” said junior Michael Saber, a member of the improv team.

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